Regular readers of this blog are no strangers to free and open source software. From Firefox to Brave, Node.js to OpenSSL, and jQuery to React (finally), today’s web developer can’t get very far at all without relying on “FOSS.” However, there is a huge difference between consuming FOSS and maintaining FOSS. The latter task is […]

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Back in 2012, on a day that is now ensconced in company lore, the IRC user tkellen joined the channel for the Bocoup-maintained F/OSS project, Grunt. The stranger immediately began to vent on all the shortcomings he saw in the task runner. This was our introduction to Tyler Kellen. We’re reflecting on that event today […]

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This is part one in a series on the intersection of module bundlers and testing frameworks. Our focus will be webpack and jest but the techniques explored here can be reused with other tools as well. Modern websites and applications are routinely built by combining hundreds of small JavaScript modules. In order to increase the […]

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Sue Lockwood recently left Bocoup to start a new job at Splice. There’s a lot we’re going to miss about working with her, but I think it all boils down to passion. Sue pours her energy into everything she does, and everyone at Bocoup benefited from that. It’s fair to say that we all know […]

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Do you know a bit of R and have some data you need to visualize quickly? In this blog post we take a look at Rstudio’s Shiny package and the first steps toward creating a working interactive to explore your data with it. What is Shiny? Shiny is a framework to develop web-based frontends for […]

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In part one of this series we started learning how to make maps rendered by WebGL, a browser based hardware-accelerated graphics API for 2D and 3D graphics. Our access to this technology was via Tangram, a map rendering library from Mapzen. This post will focus primarily on shaders, those perplexing parallel programs that power our […]

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If you are a web developer working on a Mac, you can become a hero for thousands of people out there by assuring that anything you create for the web can be read properly by a screen reader. This blog post is going to teach you how to access and wield this super power that […]

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Maps are both practical and political. They possess undoubtable utility for navigating the physical world and have a long history of being used to shape and reshape the our social and political conceptions of the world. The ability to mark a territory, carve up a continent (or remember one), count a people, or map our […]

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While working on visualizing the results of internet speed test data for Measurement Lab, it became clear that there wouldn’t always be data for every geographic location on every single day. We might go several days without meeting a minimum threshold of tests, meaning there would be gaps in our data. This is a pretty […]

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Our last article about BoxArt showed how to use BoxArt’s Animated component to animate a tile-dropping game built in React. This time, we are going to look at some features of how Animated optimizes animations for performance. The Beastliness of Layout Thrash There’s a performance nightmare constantly threatening when you’re animating in the browser. As […]

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