Last week, I attended my first ever CSSConf. CSSConf, as the name suggests is an event that focuses on all things CSS, with a speckling of front end dev and accessibility. This year, the conference was run by Bocoup and took place at the New York comedy landmark Caroline’s on Broadway – and the event […]

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Look, I like good typography as much as the next person—maybe even a little more. When a CSS property came along with promises to doctor all my type with ligatures and carefully calculated kerning—not some half-assed tracking, but real kerning—I jumped at it. I put text-rendering: optimizeLegibility on headings, body copy, navigation links; I slapped […]

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There is a notion in the software industry that teams are either “doing Scrum” or not. That is true in some cases, but the majority of teams are using a hybrid of methodologies based on their experiences and situation. Some of this apparent isolation is linguistic: Scrum has its own terminology for some notions that […]

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The RICG’s work is starting to wind down, but we’re just getting started at the same time. We’re a weird sort of web standards organization. We’re nebulous by design: a rallying point for anyone that wants to get involved in the kinds of new standards that most impact their daily work. We aim to prevent […]

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I’ve always been a huge proponent of building sites that work everywhere — any user, any browser, any device, any context. Websites work everywhere by default, and they stay that way so long as we know how not to break them. That’s what the Open Web means to me: ensuring that entire populations just setting […]

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CSS is awful, but it doesn’t have to be that way. For example, new languages that compile to CSS like Stylus, Less, and Sass have made it much less painful to lay out and style web projects. However, these projects are limited: they provide delicious, delicious sugar, but ultimately they are using the same core […]

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Back in January, we announced the receipt of a Prototype Fund grant from Knight Foundation to explore the question: how does one design data visualization for mobile devices? Why are we asking this question? Data Visualization is common in everyday communication online and in print media. As consumers shift to mobile devices for their daily […]

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For the CSS overflow property, should auto or hidden be the default instead of visible? If you write a lot of CSS, there is a good chance your immediate response would be “no way!” But hear me out! There are several awesome benefits to one of these being the default, and in my opinion, many […]

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In the world of web design it’s more common to condemn or praise existing work than it is to talk about the actual process of creating something great. For example, over the years I’ve complained more and more about restaurant websites. I don’t just mean the ones that play background music, rely on Flash, use […]

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While data visualization is growing as a medium on the Open Web, practitioners of the field still struggle to make data visualization “work” on different screens. The question “how do I render at different sizes?” is an important one, but only tackles a portion of the greater challenge of “what does it mean to create […]

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